It’s the weekend and you know what that means: PAWWWWWWTAAAAAYYYYYY! Let’s start it off with some good news though, okay?

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Ah, the simple things in life. Cake!

As I said before, when I did a post about kids, I was going to do something for the teens. Not all of them are glued to the cell phone screen.

For instance, high school senior Alec Leslie was driving when he noticed what appeared to be a car accident. Sure enough, it was. The driver was still in the car and unconscious.

The only thing that kept McNutt alert and alive until paramedics arrived was Leslie talking to him about his family.

There’s some other great notes in there. Last few lines got me SLIGHTLY teary eyed.

Billy is blind. He has a genetic disease. He’s overcoming it all. His thoughts:

“Being blind is not a disability,” he said. “It’s just an inconvenience.”

Okay, Billy. A few things he’s done even while blind:

An inconvenience that hasn’t stopped him from playing junior G-man or exposing bugs in the programs of a global Internet giant. He has perfect pitch hearing – somewhat to the chagrin of his choir teacher, who gets corrected by Billy when he sings an off note, Terri said. If someone drops coins, Billy can say how much change fell based on tones made by different coins striking the ground.

He also can tell what number someone dialed on their phone by distinguishing the distinct tones for each number. In fact, Billy’s gift has helped the Federal Bureau of Investigation by listening to recordings and telling them what phone number was dialed, his mother said. The FBI discovered his talent when he met a technician at one of the many technology conventions he has attended.

Holy…HOLY…WHAT!? He’s the man! He’s 14!

And there’s more in the story! He’s not done yet.

Lastly, a teen and her friends have a passion for fashion and for helping women. So, they are running a non-profit organization called Clothes for Change. They sell clothes for money which goes into helping young women in need.

A teen at Myers Park High School started a nonprofit selling designer clothing to help young women. Audrey Huynh and her friends at the school are sorting clothes and figuring out price tags. They plan to sell all of the items, which were donated to their nonprofit Clothes for Change. “We wanted to give, especially women, the opportunity to be part of that exchange, and be getting something for making a difference in the community,” Huynh said.

Great job.

I’m actually feeling inspired today. How about you?

-DALANEL

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