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A volunteer firefighter was driving by a building when he noticed smoke:

He said he was driving by and saw smoke rising from the building, which has businesses downstairs and apartments above. He said he banged on the doors to alert residents, then ran outside to tell people to call 911. That’s when Cordero’s boyfriend, James Lucas, ran back into the building with Hope to save his son, Ky-Mani.

A hero that is honest:

The heroic firefigher, Ed Hope, 49, of Smithtown, said he always wondered how it is that firefighters just drive by buildings on fire by happenstance, until it happened to him. “For a half a second I almost kept driving by,” said Hope, who has been a firefighter for nearly 20 years and is a former captain with the Uniondale voluteers.

I didn’t even know that was a thing for firefighters. Huh. But, thankfully, he did stop.

A nonprofit is trying to help end homelessness. I’ll let them explain it:

“This store is set up to provide support for ‘no longer homeless’ both in material and in monetary support,” association member Joseph Boatman said. “We are a nonprofit and our goal is to help end homelessness in veterans and all of our efforts go to that purpose.”

Yeah. So, let’s get a little breakdown on what we’re helping:

Boatman said many of the veterans who are helped through the program are victims of post-traumatic stress disorder and have difficulties coming back to the United States after serving many tours of duty in the war. “A lot of people feel alienated from the war issues. They feel alienated from civilians and the only people they’ll talk to is other vets. They end up breaking up homes and marriages and just end up on the streets,” he said. “Eventually they come around and get tired of it, get tired of being cold, hungry and they want to reintegrate into society and we do that.”

Got it. Man, we don’t always hit on that but veterans go through that. Keep them in your prayers.

Okay, welp, that’s all folks.

-DALANEL

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