life-quotes-41

This first bit of news is slightly odd. A man was trying to donate $3,000, and got turned down twice. Yeah. Apparently, his status as an atheist was what drove people away. He eventually gave it to a food pantry.

Mehta originally raised the money in late October following news that American Legion Post 134 pulled its support from the Morton Grove Park District in response to a park board commissioner’s refusal to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance. Park officials returned the check, though, citing a desire to avoid a “First Amendment dispute.”

He next tried the Morton Grove Public Library, but experienced similar results. A library board trustee called Mehta’s blog, the Friendly Atheist, a “hate group,” and questioned the legality of accepting a donation originally intended for the park district.

So, this leads me to this question: If you were an organization and were presented with a check for $3,000 from the same man, would you accept it? Before you answer, look at this:

“It’s immaterial to me who the individual is making the donation,” he said. “We should be appreciative of the donation and make sure it is used to the benefit of the people of Niles Township. I’m grateful for the $3,000.” His only concern, he said, was that other donors would pull funding, thinking the pantry was making some kind of political or religious statement.

This person was from the food pantry. There’s two sides here. Pick one.

Next, a seven year old saves his grandfather’s life.

Adam Smith was at home in Pennywell, Sunderland, with sister Amy, three, when 76-year-old Bob Donkin collapsed with severe chest pains. Mr Donkin was having a heart attack but Adam kept calm and dialled 999 after he and Amy helped their grandad to lie down. The youngster went and got the pensioner’s medication to show the ambulance crew when they arrived. He also locked their dog in another room, all while looking after his little sister, on January 2.

Great job, Adam and Amy! No, I’m not the only one who thought so:

The siblings will now be rewarded with certificates of merit from the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS) for their bravery.

One more thing:

A spokeswoman for the NEAS said: “Given their ages, Adam and Amy did remarkably well to keep cool heads. Being with someone who is suffering a heart attack can be a traumatic and distressing experience, so to have the presence of mind to call 999, which probably saved their grandad’s life, is something that deserves public recognition.”

Nice. Have a good Saturday!

-DALANEL

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