C’mon now, you know what time it is. First, a reunion between two men. One saved the other from committing suicide. It had been six years since that day, but they finally met again.

Laybourn, walking across Waterloo Bridge on his way to work on January 14, 2008, had stopped Benjamin from committing suicide. On Tuesday Benjamin was able finally to thank him.

So, six years later, how did these two strangers manage to meet?

And then, two weeks ago, Benjamin – with the help of the Rethink Mental Illness charity – launched a campaign to “Find Mike”, his nickname for the stranger. Doing so, he decided, would not only allow him to “close the door on that chapter of my life”, but also help to generate more interest in mental health issues.

The campaign spread quickly thanks to social media. Within two days, Laybourn’s fiancée saw the story on Facebook and immediately knew her partner was “Mike”.

One more:

A meeting was quickly arranged. Benjamin admits that he was “petrified” about the encounter, but Laybourn was excited. Their hug lasted for some time; so, too, did the talking – despite meeting in a pub, the two never even got around to having a drink.

And there’s more in there. The article goes into the history of Benjamin’s problems with a “chronic schizoaffective disorder, which means he is prone to deep depressions and paranoia”.

Next, well…

Westphal traveled the world not once, but 5 times on his bicycle. He did this after doctors diagnosed him with malignant melanoma in 1987.

Yeah. Doctors told him he had a year left to live. So, he went onto start biking. He didn’t literally go around the world. But, the miles he logged were enough to say he basically did. And cancer wasn’t even the only thing stopping him:

In Argentina he nearly died by the side of the road. “A car rolls over me, killed my first dog Shikan. The guy put me in a ditch next to my dead dog and leaves” said Westphal.

Wow.

Jesse Reynolds is a “Hometown Hero” which is an honor from the American Red Cross:

He continues to coach area little league teams and youth basketball, flag football and middle school track. Reynolds said he appreciates helping with the younger kids to help prepare them for higher levels of competition.

Reynolds said his main passion comes through his ministry, The Well, which he founded in 2012. In this capacity, Reynolds said he can work with local families in need and continue to devote his time to child welfare issues.

Through his time as a pastor, Reynolds has helped area children with crisis management at Vinton County schools. VCHS Principal Kevin Waddell nominated Reynolds for the Hometown Hero award for his dedicating coaching and therapeutic work with the schools.

As you can see, he has a heart for the young people.

Last is crazy. Here’s the first thing:

The incredible technology, revealed by MailOnline last year, is the first bionic hand that allows the user to feel the sensation of touch though the device.

That’s right, he can feel again. And then, a little bit on how it works:

The artificial hand detects information about touch using electrical signals from artificial tendons controlling finger movement. Fine wires send the digitally refined impulses to four electrodes implanted in the sensory ulnar and median nerves of the upper arm.

So, how soon can we expect to see this as the norm?

The results of the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, are the first step towards a true bionic hand which can feel as well as move, say the scientists. However, they point out that it will be years before such a device becomes commercially available.

Oh well. One day.

-DALANEL

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